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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
of human nature right next to each other. there are so many places where -- >> have you met with taliban women? women of the taliban? >> i've met women of afghanistan who have been oppressed by the taliban. i've met with women in pakistan who have been poorly treated by the extremists who are part of the pakistani taliban. so in many places there are organized groups that are determined to turn the clock back on women. but it's not just in the worst places, there are pockets of those kinds of people, men, primarily, some women who support them, but it's primarily male-driven, who really don't want women to have any voice or any role or any rights. and we have to stand up against that wherever it happens. >> you went from being, you know, much maligned as first lady by the right wing to being the most respected woman in america, and perhaps the most famous woman in the world. what does that feel like for you personally? >> i rallyon't think about it. i feel like i've been the same person my entire life. i hope i've learned some things. i hope i've become more effective in doing what, i be
, the odds became clear. these 53 americans were surrounded by more than 300 taliban fighters. what happened next has been described as one of the most intense battles of the entire war in afghanistan. the attackers had the advantage, a high ground, the mountains above. and they run the machine -- they were unleashing everything they had, rocket-propelled grenades, mortars, snipers taking aim. to those americans coming -- to those americans down below, the fire was coming from every direction. they had never seen anything like it. gunfire impacting all around them, clinton raised to one of the barracks machine guns. he took aim at one of the enemy teams and took it out. a rocket-propelled grenade exploded, sending shrapnel into his hip, his arm, and into his neck. but he kept fighting, disregarding his own wound, and tending to an injured conrad-- comrade instead. then over the radio came words no soldier ever wants to hear. enemy in the wire. the taliban had penetrated the camp and were taking over buildings. the combat was close, at times as close as 10 feet. when clinton took aim at three
- month deadline for talks with the taliban in afghanistan. are they able to function in society? and two, what is the best strategy for the united states in afghanistan in the long term? but she has asked two really big questions. the first is to speak and to afghanistan with the taliban and whether they can be integrated into society. they do have constitutional obligations to uphold. , with the looking at united states, transitions in afghanistan as well. there's a time line of elections to be held in afghanistan, as you know. these are processes and political decisions that the afghans must make themselves. i say this, and i do want to point to the historic shift that pakistan is very consciously and proactively making. our government has been very clear, including all of our stakeholders including the military that pakistan will be making all effort to stabilize afghanistan and bring peace to the region, because it is in all of our vital interests. we cannot walk away from the region. we live right there. and a stable and prosperous and peaceful afghanistan is in the best interest of
a taliban terrorist in california, pay raise. no, freeze for three years. over the last five years one i.c.e. agent killed, one secret service agent killed, three a.t.f. agents killed, one d.e.a. agent killed, two u.s. marshals killed, air traffic controller to put the safety for my family and your family and our constituents as they fly through the sky, the n.i.h. my family has been devastated my cancer. my father died at cancer. my mother died of cancer and it's impacted on my family. dr. collins, who mapped the human genome system that will save many of you and your lives and your sons and daughters because of basically following that system, working on liver cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, which my mom died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west wh
the nra still wield all the power it once did in washington? and the voice the taliban tried to silence. the inspiration and recovery of mulala. for the first time today she is speaking out in her own words. this is an dre mitchell reports only on msnbc. ♪ if loving you is wrong ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes that way. [ female announcer ] honey nut cheerios cereal -- heart-healthy, whole grain oats. you can't go wrong loving it. some brokerage firms are. but way too many aren't. why? because selling their funds makes them more money. which makes you wonder. isn't that a conflict? go to e-trade. we've got over 8,000 mutual funds and not one of them has our name on it. e-trade. less for us. more for you. >>> in our headlines today, funeral services are being held today in new york city for the long-time mayor ed koch at a manhattan synagogue. his coffin was draped with the new york city flag as president bill clinton led other political figures in praising the street-wise mayor for his political accumin. >> i don't think i ever
region of south waziristan. the pakistani taliban claims responsibility. they say the attack is revenge for two drone strikes that killed two of their leaders. two militants also died in the atta attack. >>> also new this morning, north korea is renewing threats against the united states. the country is promising to retaliate against the u.s. for having so-called double standards after neighboring country south korea launched a rocket this week. washington condemned north korea's rocket launch in december but not south korea's launch. north korea hassed no said how it will retaliate. u.s. and south korean diplomats claim north korea used bann enn missile technology. >>> right now, vice president joe biden is meeting with leaders in germany. earlier this morning, he talked about iran's nuclear ambitions at a security conference in munich. he says there's still room for diplomacy if iran is willing to make a good faith effort. >>> today marks one year since the murder of a transgender woman in northeast d.c. mayor vincent gray will be among those attending a vigil today at the bus stop wh
and the taliban. what on earth are we doing over there? why do we care about the hearts or minds or building the schools? i mean, outside of osama bin laden going to afghanistan and tricking the taliban into this spectacular attack on america, in general the muslims in afghanistan like the ones in indonesiaia have not exported terrorism. that's been the specialty of other countries. they really just want to be left alone so why don't we just leave them alone, as long as they're not plotting an attack on us, what is the point? >> michelle flournoy just laid out calmly four or five great ways to reduce the pentagon budget, including getting out of afghanistan, taking the civilian population in the d.o.d. down because we're leaving afghanistan. i thought it was pretty good, ann. somebody ought to listen to her. >> yes, i agree. i'm glad you brought up with her the base closings. this is why you seed something like a closure. the american people are of two find minds. they think government should be smaller, thinks government wants too. but the second you name a specific program that's going to
. and soon, the awful odds became clear. these 53 americans were surrounded by more than 300 taliban fighters. what happened next has been described as one of the most intense battles of the entire war in afghanistan. the attackers had the advantage. the high ground, the mountains above. an they were unleashing everything they had. rocket propelled grenades. heavy machine. mort mortars. snipers taking aim. to those americans down below, the fire was coming in from every single direction. they'd never seen anything like it. with gun fire impacting all around him, clint raced to one of the bar racks and grabbed a machine gun. he took aim at one of the enemy machine teams and took it out. a rocket propelled grenade exploded, sending shrapnel in to his hip, his arm and his neck. but he kept fighting. disregarding his own wounds and tending to an injured comrade instead. then over the radio, came words no solder ever wants to hear. enemy in the wire. the taliban had penetrated the camp. they were taking over buildings. the combat was close,
. these 53 americans were surrounded by more than 300 taliban fighters. what happened next has been described as one of the most intense battles of the entire war in afghanistan. the attackers had the advantage, a high ground, the mountains above. and they run the machine -- they were unleashing everything they had, rocket-propelled grenades, mortars, snipers taking aim. to those americans coming -- to those americans down below, the fire was coming from every direction. they had never seen anything like it. with gun packed -- with gunfire impacting all around them, clinton raised to one of the barracks machine guns. he took aim at one of the enemy teams and took it out. a rocket-propelled grenade exploded, sending shrapnel into his hip, his arm, and into his neck. but he kept fighting, disregarding his own wound, and tending to an injured conrad instead. then over the radio came words no soldier ever wants to hear. enemy in the wire. the taliban had penetrated the camp and were taking over buildings. -- at times as close as 10 feet. when clinton took aim at three of them, they never took ano
with their six-month deadline on top of the taliban. you ever envision where the taliban as a political party functioning the society. and do you think that the likelihood of the strategy is the best on long-term? >> she's has to live the questions. the first is to speak in terms of where they see the taliban output level and where they see the taliban integrated the mainstream in their society. they do have constitutional obligations to uphold and we are also looking not the united states in afghanistan as well. there is a timeline right now of an election to be held in afghanistan i see now. the desire processes and political decisions to make themselves. and when i say this, i do want to point that historic shift of pakistan is consciously and proactively making. our government has been very clear, including all are stakeholders that pakistan is going to strenuously support all efforts at stabilizing afghanistan and bringing peace to the region because that is banal our vital interests. as i said to me cannot walk away from the region. is faithful and peaceful afghanistan is in the first i
the taliban among them. >> let me get that. we consider those groups, obviously a threat to the united states. they're the groups that we are in a conflict with, authorized by the authorization for use of military force by the congress and those are the groups against which we run our efforts primarily around, in afghanistan. in south asia, and in other parts of the world. that's the focus of the united states effort because those are the groups that threaten the united states. what president karzai is sayi and we e movi to implement that decisions, in support of this, he is saying that afghans should provide for the core security in afghanistan. that they should be in the lead focused against the insurgency which threatens the afghan government. that's the taliban. >> right. >> and but that's what we're training in supporting and resourcing the afghans to do. and so very importantly, this may, may of 2013, 2013, the mission, the focus of the u.s. forces and the isap forces, the international forces working with the united states will change. and as of may of 2013, these forces, our forces wi
to be honored for heroism. how he led a small band of soldiers against hundreds of taliban and incredible odds. [ male announcer ] how do you measure happiness? by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total your new car, we give you the money for a new one. call... to talk to an insurance expert about everything else that comes standa
on fox news using some scary language to talk about guns. >> we are all obsessed with the taliban and we ought to be. what about these gangs that are ruining neighborhoods. we need a federal task force, if it takes 500 agents, 1,000 agents, go into chicago. >> now chicago is the taliban, right? this feels like fear. >> it's an interesting thing. actually, i wouldn't be surprised if a lot of low income residents agreed with that. look, we want more law enforcement, we want this to be treated as a national emergency. maybe not with the same language. put 1,000 agents on the street of chicago, a lot of people might be in favor of that. >> weren't they away from the international treaty like that. you have to realize when he's talking, this is a guy whose main directive is to make more gun sales. slate had an article 300 million guns, shotguns for sporting. there's a diminishing return of sales there. now the big market is in the sort of vicarious fake military guy. that is where the market is growing. people buying assault weapons like ar-15s to pretend they are in the military and doing fa
overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there. of course, afghanistan fell apart and we had go back. anorak it's falling apart very, very quickly. we are facing an insurgency, we don't know what to do. like nagl, all the officers who were there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. they do know what to do so they did what they usually do. which was to bang down doors and arrest and kill people, which is anybody who would read nagl what is known is counterproductive because you wind up killing the wrong people. you inflame, you this off their brother and their cousins and they become insurgents, too. so the insurgents is going. meanwhile, petraeus upend mosul besides to put into effect the ideas of these books he's been reading. so he and his guys, they start setting up elections for the new district council. they set up the elections. they bring in fuel trucks from turkey. they read open the university. they get to mutation systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria along northern iraq. it is all this on his own. he's
. in afghanistan we won on the ground and now we will be negotiating with the taliban and instead of in powering the afghani civil society. i could go on for not africa. lou: and judy miller is shaking her head. are you next going to say you endorse negotiating with terrorists? >> i don't, but on the other hand, they are there. lou: they do have that fundamental advantage in the negotiation. >> they are not going home, not waiting for the victory parade. they are there and you must deal with them. lou: or you have to eliminate them. >> or you have to eliminate them. lou: that was our option over two administrations, and we chose not to follow. >> i think it is impossible to eliminate all of them in a democracy like ours. lou: speaking of disasters, your quick reaction, if i may, to the confirmation of chuck hegel. >> it is simple. there isothing new here. this policy will be the policy of the administration and though he represented better than secretary clinton because he will try to engage the iranian without the iranian people. he will try to see how he can settle the issue in syria without b
was killed when the bomber blew him up in ankara yesterday, a journalist was injured. >>> taliban militants are claiming responsibility for a deadly attack on an army base in northwest pakistan. authorities say at least six soldiers and a dozen militants were killed. tenancivillians also died when one of the militants went into a nearby house and blew himself up. >>> the obama administration is offering a compromise to faith-based groups on birth control. it's proposing revised guidelines that would allow them to opt out of federal requirements that they provide their employees with health insurance coverage for contraceptives under the new health care reform law. women who work for faith-affiliated hospitals, universities, and other institutions could still receive contraceptives through separate health policies at no charge. >>> robert menendez is facing an ethics probe about whether he accepted improper gifts from a prominent donor. he acknowledges he flew on the man's private plane several times through the dominican republic, but insists the trips were paid for appropriately. he's also
. it was deliberate because the plan was overthrow saddam and get out. just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there and of course afghanistan fell apart. i and iraq is falling apart very quickly. we are facing an insurgency we don't know what to do with like all the officers who are there have not been trained to fight this sort of war. it was not in the manuals and they didn't know what to do so they do what they usually do which was to bang down doors and arrest people. anyone who has read kahlÚa would have known as counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people and you inflame -- you make them mad so the insurgents is flaming and meanwhile petraeus in mosul decides to put into effect the ideas in these books he has been reading. he and his guys start setting up an election for the new district. they vet the candidates candidatecandidate s and they said that the elections. they bring in fuel trucks. they reopened the university. they get communication systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria
in the fight against terrorism? >> it's extremely successful if the infrastructure of the taliban and al qaeda, but by identifying the enemy on the ground through various means of gathering intelligence. the goal of the establishment is to destroy people and property. if you want stuff blown up and people killed, we're the guys to talk to. if you want political objectives achieved, the military establishment are not the people to turn to. to the extent of destroy enemy troops, we've identified. destroy enemy training camps and so on, using the drones, great. bomb them? sure, you bet. if what we're trying to achieve is stable government in afghanistan who has control of the majority of the area, we're not going to do that. military people are not the people to do that. do we use the economic instrument of power adequately? no. do we use the diplomatic instrument of power adequately? no. do we integrate all three of these -- military, economic, and diplomatic -- in a seamless fabric of the use of american power worldwide to achieve specific objectives and goals in various places around the world
in afghanistan about the taliban and after that i was here in boston visiting jenna. we went shopping and delays and the cosmetic counter in the department store and came up and said thank you so much for speaking for women in afghanistan. that was really the first time that i thought, they heard me. -- in austin. i think i knew the first lady had a podium, but i did not really know until after that. >> c-span has this first of a kind project for television, examining the public and private lives of the women to serve as first lady. season one begins next monday president's day at 9:00 a.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on mondays we take a look at your money, how taxpayer dollars are being spent. our focus today is rebuilding afghanistan. john sopko is our guest. he's the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction. we were just talking about you have your own acronym in washington, that's important. the price tag so far for rebuilding afghanistan, $87 billion. what is your role in overseeing that money? guest:
. >>> and the pakistani teenager who was shot by the taliban for promoting school for girls has been released from the hospital. malala was wounded in her back and head in october. she was moved to a british hospital where she underwent multiple operations to are restore her skull and hearing. she will continue rehab in her family's new home in england. >>> that is it for me for now. we hope you come back at midnight where i will be here with our team as the worst of the blizzard hits between the 10:00, 11:00, and overnight hours. i will be up with you from midnight until 5:00 a.m. i hope you join me. in the meantime, stay right here because "the situation room" with wolf blitzer starts now. wolf. >>> brooke, thanks very much. happening now, the storm's picking up and forecasters say boston's going to get clobbered. we're going to talk with one of the country's top blizzard experts. >>> out in california, authorities say there's no panic as the manhunt continues for a suspected cop killer. you're going to hear from a man who knew him and even called him a friend at one point. >>> and mystery solve
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
out of her hands. but in pakistan the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing, her repairing of applianc appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan, wasn't it a pretty complicated mess, not only where places as trudy knows, like pakistan, but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where, you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over the last four years has been a complicated place who would have expected that actually europe our closee-- closest allies would have been in a period of enormous internal turmoil greater than anything they have seen since the end of world war 2. so clinton was left to manage those relationships. i think i would say that she was often a soother, but often as not she was also someone who would speak out in a tough manner. look
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)